Why is my pup eating grass?

Its true. Our pups tend to eat that early summer grass. This could be caused by a number of medical conditions from upset stomach, low quality food, or intestional parasites so you should seek out a vet’s advice just in case. A student of mine just contacted me to ask how to get her dog to stop eating grass so let’s help everyone with this frustrating problem!

First off, the simplest answer is usually the best answer. So here goes – your dog probably just likes to eat grass. Which of course changes nothing so we then ask the same question as any problem. If you don’t like what your dog is doing, teach them something to do instead. So of course there are a ton of options but I have a couple of favorites!

Dog eating grass

One is to teach a solid “leave it”. “Leave it” means to “stop what you’re doing and look at me”. It’s a fabulous safety cue but it also allows you to give your dog another cue just in time to stay out of mischief (i.e. “leave it” followed by “sit”). The best way to learn this is in a class setting where a Certified Professional Dog Trainer can coach you through the process.

The other is to take your dog out on a leash and work on loose leash walking skills. You absolutely need a trainer to learn this one but if I had to summarize loose leash walking would be to teach your dog to be at your side offering lots of eye contact. Dogs who know how to walk on a leash will offer plenty of eye contact – so much so they’ll ignore that silly grass.

For more information, check ask about home lessons or our upcoming classes here!

Grass?!

It’s true. Our pups love grass. There can also be a variety of medical conditions going on so you should seek out a vet’s advice just in case its a poor diet or intestional worms. A student of mine just contacted me to ask how to get her dog to stop eating grass so lets’s help everyone with this frustrating problem!

The answer is the same as any problem. If you don’t like what your dog is doing, what would you rather have your do instead? So of course there are a ton of options but I have a couple of favorites!

One is to teach a solid “leave it”. “Leave it” means to “stop what you’re doing and look at me. It’s a fabulous safety cue but it also allows you to give your dog another cue just in time to stay out of mischief. The best way to learn this is in a class setting where a Certified Professional Dog Trainer can coach you through the process. I’ll give it a try. Drop a yummy treat on the floor and cover it with your shoe. Your pup should immediately start sniffing, maybe even licking your shoe. Wait until they look at you and then mark and reward. Much better to see in person!

The other is to take your dog out on a leash and work on loose leash walking skills. You absolutely need a class to learn this one but if I had to summarize loose leash walking would be to teach your dog to be at your side. Dogs who know how to walk on a leash will offer plenty of eye contact – so much so they’ll ignore that silly grass.

For more information, check in home lessons or our upcoming classes here!

Dogs & Car Rides

I’ve been thinking about one of our dog’s favorite pasttimes quite a bit lately. The warmer weather is here and our dog’s heads are hanging out the window, no doubt capturing each and every scent. The problem is there’s nothing safe about this scenario. You would never let your child run free in the back seat (or gasp! the front seat).front seat dog

Your dog poses an amazing distraction to you as a driver. I hear time after time how Poochie has to sit up front. Don’t forget how dangerous the air bag is! If you are in a wreck and the air bags deploy with such force, you are risking your dogs life!

While it’s not the perfect way to transport your dog, a car approved harness that was scientifically tested by the Center for Pet Safety can be one option. It helps strap your pup in the backseat safely. No air bags, no roaming, no distraction. Studies have shown that these offer less than ideal safety but they are always improving. Seat belts work by attaching a car approved harness to the seatbelt. It is probably the best option for larger dogs who can’t be crated in a vehicle.

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The hands down best option is to be crated safely in the back. According to the Center for Pet Safety,  prices range from $150 to $1000. Wire crates will be damaged in an accident. Do not use them. Visit Check out Gunner Kennels to save your dogs life.

And for the record, NEVER, and I mean NEVER, let them ride in the back of the truck bed.

Visit the Center for Pet Safety’s website to find a safe product.

Happy driving!